Excerpts

Here are a few excerpts chosen more or less at random. The book contains 405 equations and 72 figures.

 

Page16   

 Figure 1                          

Coordinate System             

with Origin  at the              

 Big Bang                         

 

Figure 2The spatial coordinate origin and the axes can be oriented in any direction from the observer. There is no reason to choose one orientation over another.

Using this coordinate system, x and y represent distances within the spherical surface to a point in question, and the T axis is always at right angles to the surface of the sphere representing the present galactic time1 at every point. The passage of time involves moving along the T axis, whereas relative motion of any point or body away from the observer at the origin represents the motion through three dimensional space, as this space, in turn, expands through the time-like T dimension.

 

 

 

 

FIGURE 8   THE LOCAL PRESENT

FOR A MOVING OBJECT

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 55
 

 FIGURE 8   THE LOCAL PRESENT FOR A MOVING OBJECT

 

The measurement problem here is that, from the point of view of an observer at point B, he is moving with the velocity c in the T direction, and is stationary with respect to his coordinate system, just as the observer at point A is. So, while he sees himself progressing in the T direction, it is his own T direction, not that of the observer at point A. Thus, he ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 48

 

In Figure 6, the horizontal line in the center of the picture represents the surface of the two dimensional sphere which serves as an analog for our three dimensional Universe. The vertical axis represents the T direction, in which  the universe is moving upward at velocity c.


All the matter in the Universe shares this same velocity component.

FIGURE 6 THE PAST AND FUTURE IN AN EXPANDING UNIVERSE

 

 

Page 151

FIGURE 29 ENERGY TRANSFER IN THE LOCAL TIME UNIVERSE


 

The same thing would be true if the velocity were exactly one half v0. In this case, the electron would make one half orbit in the same time interval, but it would appear regularly at the halfway point, t4, and the original point, t0 = t8.


The same reasoning holds for velocities that are integer fractions of v0. One third the synchronous velocity would produce a return to the original position in three time intervals, but again, this would occur less frequently than for the full synchronous velocity or one half the synchronous velocity.